n18
NEWS|LOL 
   |

About author

The LOL-ster

The LOL-ster

Of wisecracks, giggle-fests and all things that tickle your funny bone

Arvind Kejriwal has launched his long-awaited, much-hyped political party – the one that's going to stamp out corruption, provide a real political alternative, and bring peace and prosperity to India. Be that as it may, the only thing we really know about the party is its name: it's called the Aam Aadmi party.

And today, we ask the same question Shakespeare did all those centuries ago: What's in a name? We don't think Aam Aadmi was randomly chosen, no. There's got to be some clever reasoning behind it. Here are the top 6 possible explanations we can think of:

1. It's a reference to Katrina Kaif in that ad: All of us have seen the Slice ad where Katrina gets sensual with a few mangoes, and all of us have learnt, first-hand, the truth that Sex Sells. Since every man in India would like to be an Aam Aadmi (in the mango sense), there is clearly subliminal messaging at work in the party name. Just imagine the size of the crowd if Katrina shows up at an Aam Aadmi rally?

2. It's a reference to Alcoholics Anonymous: The signs are unmistakable – the initials of the party are AA. Both words in the name start with AA. Aam Aadmi will be the only party that is affiliated to the worldwide standard in helping alcoholics help themselves. This way, they'll get all the votes of those people who drink way too much desi daaru and think that anything AA-related can only be good. As long as they don't increase the already-vast number of dry days...

3. It's an attempt to piggyback on RK Laxman: The Common Man is the most recognizable comic strip to come out of India. Possibly voters will think that the Aam Aadmi party consists of thin, moustached, unassuming people who are everywhere and observe everything without ever speaking, and quietly give them their votes. After all, the Common Man has made us all laugh, and repayment in votes is no big deal.

4. It's an attempt to define vote banks clearly: Most political parties in India try to please everyone, to create policies that are supposed to help everybody and end up helping nobody. This party is different. By calling itself the Common Man party, it immediately excludes half of the country – the female half – from its target audience, and hopes to get all the male votes. We think this strategy is dumb, but so was letting Anna Hazare go.

5. It's a sign that money is for everyone: We all know that a political career is the surest way to get rich quick, beating other tried and tested ways like inheriting a million dollars, or inventing something revolutionary and new, or becoming the CEO of Apple. But the problem was always that only the politicians got rich. Not any more; in the Aam Aadmi party, the common man – all of us – will become rich from the fruits of corruption. The math there doesn’t quite add up, but nor does a lot of the math on the Aam Aadmi site.

6. It would look good as a political symbol: A lot of the parties we have use boring symbols – hands, lotuses, bicycles, sheaves of wheat, clocks – they’re OK as pictures in a book, but one could get confused. Not with the Aam Aadmi party. Just draw a man’s face that’s yellow and mango-shaped, with leaves where his hair should be (or use Katrina Kaif’s picture) and you have a logo that will instantly burn itself into the minds of every Aam Aadmi.

Tag : #Arvind Kejriwal #political party #Aam Aadmi Party

LOL: Reasons why team India lost the World T20 finals

from in.com

LOL: Reasons why team India lost the World T20 finals

What was the reason that an almost-perfect looking team India surrendered to the Lankan lions in the WC finals, you ask? Here are 5 probable reasons why we feel India lost:


LOL: How team India can win matches abroad

from in.com

LOL: How team India can win matches abroad

India is a tiger at home, and a bacterium abroad. After our embarrassing performances in South Africa and New Zealand, questions are being asked about whether our team is truly ready to play a cricket match anywhere outside the sub-continent. We think there is light at the end of the tunnel - we think that these 6 ideas will help India rise from the ashes and become a tiger everywhere.

What crazy thing will Justin Bieber do next?

from in.com

What crazy thing will Justin Bieber do next?

We're so worried about his recent string of crazy activities that we think he might go too far soon. He might do one of these things, for instance:

5 celebs we want to see Arnab interview

from in.com

5 celebs we want to see Arnab interview

After Arnab Goswami took Rahul Gandhi’s case in an interview (there’s really no other way of putting it) on Monday, we think that Koffee with Karan is way too boring. If we wanted to know random celeb gossip, we’d just read their tweets. But the way Arnab grills people, you have to admire him

Why did Jai Ho fail to break box office records?

from in.com

Why did Jai Ho fail to break box office records?

A few days after Jai Ho's release, it is apparent that Salman's latest film will not touch the heights achieved by Chennai Express, Krrish 3, or Dhoom 3. It might not even touch Dabangg-2 or Bodyguard, and this is in 2014, when every other film hits 100 crores domestically. So why did Jai Ho fail to break all the box office records we thought it would? We aren't sure, but here are a few reasons.

Implications of WiFi on Air India aircraft

from in.com

Implications of WiFi on Air India aircraft

Air India finally did something to make us sit up and take notice. They announced that they would provide wi-fi facilities to people on board their aircraft. This is great, but we don't think they've thought through some of the funnier consequences of their decision.

And the Jai Ho LOL-scars go to...

from in.com

And the Jai Ho LOL-scars go to...

There are three constants in life in India: the petrol prices will keep rising, Arnab and Manmohan will always be opposites, and Salman Khan movies will always stick to a formula. Whether he's a cop, a bodyguard, or an Aam Aadmi, he's basically Rajinikanth in a different body.